China Bans Hip Hop culture from TV

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CHINA MAKES SIGNIFICANT CENSORSHIP DECISION ON HIP-HOP CULTURE

ZOE ZORKA

SEPTEMBER 13, 2018

While Justin Bieber might be a worldwide sensation, there’s at least one country where he is no longer welcome: the People’s Republic of China, whose government recently released a shocking set of standards regarding what media is morally fit for public consumption. As part of an overreaching crackdown on “low taste content,” the country has recently banned most references to hip-hop culture as well as musicians, celebrities, actors, and other performers with tattoos, or whose lifestyle is considered to be out of line with the ruling party’s standards of morality.

According to Gao Changli, the publicity department director at the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television of the People’s Republic of China (SAPPRFT), there are four major”absolutes” (or rules) that outline the Chinese state-run media’s standards for decency as stated to The Independent: “Absolutely do not use actors whose heart and morality are not aligned with the party and whose morality is not noble. Absolutely do not use actors who are tasteless, vulgar and obscene. Absolutely do not use actors whose ideological level is low and have no class. Absolutely do not use actors with stains, scandals and problematic moral integrity.” Furthermore, in an interview, the Chinese state-run news media outlet Sina reported that the regulator now “specifically requires that programs should not feature actors with tattoos [or depict] hip hop culture, sub-culture and dispirited culture.”

In addition to the banning of Justin Bieber, Chinese hip-hop artists “PG One” and “GAI,” both winners of the popular television show “Rap of China” (similar to American Idol), were forced to apologize for producing content that was at odds with Communist Party values.

However, not all is lost on the Asian continent. The nearby country of South Korea continues to churn out batch after batch of K-pop stars- and k-Pop hits. Perhaps the Chinese government will follow suit and start to view music as a legitimate form of expression.

http://thesource.com/2018/09/13/china-makes-significant-censorship-decision-on-hip-hop-culture/